Category Archives: MDT

OSD – HP Driver Tips

Working on certifying drivers for some older model HPs in the shop. My options are:

1. Use Mikael Nystrom’s PowerShell is King – Export drivers from Windows good stuff if you have a box already configured how you want and it’s not Windows 7

(do a get-command export* and you'll see you can't use export-windowsdriver in Win 7)

(do a get-command export* and you’ll see you can’t use export-windowsdriver in Win 7)

Good Windows 7 Options:

2.  If you get stuck installing a driver as an application, check in Program Files/Program Files (x86) for the unpacked files to see if an .inf was dropped there.  Be careful pulling the .inf file as some of the softpaqs need the software stack to work properly (see method 4 below for this scenario).

Found the driver for bluetooth in this folder in Program Files (x86)

Found the driver for Bluetooth for a ZBook in this folder in Program Files (x86)

3. If HP, I generally find the majority of the unpacked files in c:\swsetup and then I search Program Files.

C:\SWSetup is a common unpack directory for Support Assistant and manual installs.

C:\SWSetup is a common unpack directory for Support Assistant and manual installs.

4.  Another HP trick is to use the HP Softpaq Download Manager.  Once you load up the model you want, you can right click on any of the given drivers to get the fly out menu and select cva file.  If it exists, it will give you install + silent install instructions for those pesky drivers that need to be installed as applications.

Using HPSDM to get the driver package and install instructions.

Using HPSDM to get the driver package and install instructions.

Install instructions are in a cva that you open with notepad - then scroll to the install section.

Install instructions are in a cva that you open with notepad – then scroll to the install section.

A fun tip about the cva file is if you know the softpaq number, you can just find it in this URL  (this only works if there is actually a cva – not everything has one – but better than nothing, right??)

Hacking the network driver for 6th gen NUC

Let’s say you buy a machine or have a machine that’s only supported for every OS on the planet except for the one you intend to use.  You can accept your fate – that you really don’t live with as much freedom as you want, or you can change your fate and hack drivers to get exactly what you want.  This post will show you how to do option 2 (which by the way is the correct option to pick).

Since everybody loves the NUC, we are going to hack the crap out of the 6th gen net driver to install the very unsupported Server OS.

What you need:

  • NUC net driver (I grabbed the Win10x64 one)
  • Windows 10 Driver Kit (scroll down, the actual download is about halfway down the page – and for what it’s worth, I installed it using all the default settings)
  • 7-zip (7-zip is king!)
It’s going to be really helpful to find the Device ID because you will need it for the specific driver you’re trying to hack.  The DeviceID for the network adapter on the 6th gen NUC is PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_1570&SUBSYS_20648086&REV_21 *but* you only need to match the first part – so in this case  PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_1570.  Using this info, I found the driver I wanted to hack was in the NDIS64 folder (specifically e1d64x64.inf) once I extracted the exe with 7-zip.  This is the only .inf with the matching hardware ID so I know for sure this is the file I need to edit and eventually import into my deployment workbench.Capture
To do the actual hacking, I copied the ID from this section: Capture1
and then pasted it into this one – it’s directly below where I got it from and literally the only other spot where something like this would belong – so if you’re new to this don’t be afraid!
Capture2

I kept it in the correct order as it was listed above

 

Once I did my copy paste magic, all I needed to do was save the file and then  move the NDIS64 folder away from where I extracted the LAN exe (my downloads folder) because it’s all that’s needed for the import when the time comes.
Now the driver is ready to be imported into your deployment workbench.  Since MDT doesn’t require driver signing, you’re good to go.
/NOTE: This same driver will work for Server 2016 – some of you will want to grab and edit in the NDIS65 folder but it’s just not necessary.